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Research Highlights

JGU’s faculty members and students undertake research through its schools, research centres, and institutes. Research is funded through external or internal grants, or are self-funded. To date, our researchers have undertaken projects with public, private and non-profit organizations based in India and across the globe on issues ranging from public policy, urban planning, and intellectual property rights to energy security, agrarian policy, and civil society. A selection of these research projects, both completed and ongoing, is described below to highlight our domain areas of experience and expertise.

  • To Pay or Not to Pay: Emotional and Cognitive Response to a Bribe Situation

    This study aims to understand the emotional and cognitive responses of individuals who are faced with a decision to pay or not to pay a bribe. The data comprised self-reports of individuals in India provided by Janaagraha, an NGO.

  • Unlocking the Potential of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises: An Explorative Study

    Development of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (or MSMEs) has been a priority of independent India. Initial government policies to promote this sector include encouraging cottage industries through the Khadi and Village Industries Commission Act of 1956.

  • Encoded Ethics

    In the second decade of the new millennium, ethics is fast metamorphosing from being a slogan for aggrieved human rights activists to the mainstay of ‘responsible business’.

  • Jindal Steel and Power Limited: A Journey from Family Business to World Class Organization

    This case aims to discuss the journey of Jindal Steel and Power Limited (JSPL) from being a family run business to the professional organization that it is today.

  • Identifying Profitable Clientele Using the Analytical Hierarchy Process

    This field-study project is being conducted jointly with faculty from the National Institute of Industrial Engineering (NITIE), Mumbai and the fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) Industry.

  • What Traditional Indian Sweets Mean: A Consumer- Culture Perspective

    Consuming traditional Indian sweets is a significant part of the Indian way of life. The traditional sweet industry in India is currently estimated to be worth US$8 billion.